University of Cambridge Department of Engineering Course IIB Module 4B25

4B25: Embedded Systems for the Internet of Things is a new fourth-year course developed and introduced by the Physical Computation Lab in 2017.



The typical class size is limited by the number of available hardware kits to 40 students each year.
Here are the most recent results (2018/2019) from the survey conducted by the Department of Engineering's Teaching Office on the quality of teaching in the course [PDF].

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(Click on the image above, to go to course notes)

The pictures below are for a sample of the individual student projects, for students who gave consent for pictures of their final demo system to be used in future instances of 4B25.


Pedometer (using 3-axis MEMS accelerometer, ARM Cortex-M0+, and 96x64 color OLED display from the course kit in custom laser-cut enclosure):


Bike theft alarm (using 3-axis MEMS accelerometer and ARM Cortex-M0+ from the course kit, in custom 3D-printed enclosure):


Pedometer (using 3-axis MEMS accelerometer, ARM Cortex-M0+, and color 96x64 OLED display from the course kit):


Plant health monitor using external conductivity, light, temperature, and humidity sensors together with the ARM Cortex-M0+ and color 96x64 OLED display from the course kit:


Sensor fusion (GPS + velocity) using FRDM KL25Z and GPS module together with 3-axis MEMS accelerometer and 96x64 OLED display from the course kit:


Razor cut prediction (HDC1000 humidity sensor and force-sensing resistor together with 3-axis MEMS accelerometer and ARM Cortex-M0+ from the course kit):


RFID-based class attendance monitor (using INA219 current measurement board, ARM Cortex-M0+, and color 96x64 OLED display from the course kit):


Custom multi-layer PCB for sports injury detection, using the same KL03 ARM Cortex-M0+ as in the course kit:


Electric bike controller (using INA219 current monitor, ARM Cortex-M0+, and color 96x64 OLED display from the course kit):


Pedometer (using a counter module attached to the ARM Cortex-M0+ and 3-axis MEMS accelerometer from the course kit):


OpenGL subset (rotating pyramid demo) and OLED display driver implemented in only 2k RAM on the microcontroller, using the ARM Cortex-M0+ and color 96x64 OLED display from the course kit:


University of Cambridge Department of Engineering IIA Project GB3

GB3: RISC-V Processor Design is a new third-year project developed and introduced by the Physical Computation Lab in 2019.



The typical class size is limited by the number of available hardware kits to 21 students each year.

Generic placeholder image
(Click on the image above, to go to course notes)